Find Missing Files in a Backup

Long time no write… I had many ideas for blog posts, but no time to write them. Hopefully, this will change soon. Here just a small update… As you know (if you read my blog), I have a “special” way of storing and “backupping” my files. All my documents are stored in a folder named YYYY/ (e.g. 2021) and have the format YYYYMMDD-<some-name>.<some-ending>. I further categorize my files by using macOS tags.

Every year I prepare a folder tax-YYYY/, where I copy all the files with relevance to my tax declaration. But sometimes I am not completely sure whether all the files in there are in my main YYYY/ folders, too. This is, because I copy files from my e-mail (like invoices) and some files, which relate to year YYYY are from YYYY+1, e.g. the proof of social security. So, after finishing the tax declaration I double check, whether every file that belongs to a year made its way into the corresponding folder with a dedicated unix command (here exemplarily for 2019). For sure this can be used to check the completeness of backup folders, too. A recursive variant may even be used to search complete backups for missing duplicates/files. So here is the command.

 
ls 2019* | while read file; do; \ 
found=$(find ../2019 -name $file | wc -l); \
if [ $found -eq 0 ]; then; echo $file; fi; \
done 

Be aware, that this does only search for a file with the same name. It does not check whether it is not the same file (e.g. due to file changes). This can be done by using a hashing algorithm

Exciting 🤓.

Repair a Damaged Package System after Ubuntu Dist-Upgrade

Happy new year.

My blog runs on a VM at Hetzner with an Ubuntu LTS system. That means 5 years of support… I was running trusty from 2014, so there should be support until 2019. But not every open source software has given you this promise, just the Ubuntanians. So, support for Owncloud run out last year and I thought that the days between years are a good time to switch to a new version.

Hence, I did two dist-upgrades after another from trusty to xenial and from xenial to the current LTS version bionic (every 2 years a new LTS version is coming out). The first upgrade was “successful” with a lot of need for adaption in the configurations afterwards. Then after everything worked again, I did another upgrade, which failed because of this issue.

You do not want your system showing you such a message during do-release-update.

That is, I had to fix a distro upgrade that failed in between… challenge accepted 🤓.

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Inherit TimeMachine Backups

Lately I had to restore my macbook from time machine. Luckily, the reason was that I got a new MacBook 🤓. So I created a last time machine backup, said goodbye to my old macbook, and moved on to my new machine, starting with restoring from my all new time machine backup. I did this several times now and it went well every time. And… no problem this time either and this is what I tell all my jealous Linux and Windows friends. But what I didn’t tell them is that the next step is less fun: inheriting the backups of the old machine.

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VirtualBox v4.2.18 with Native Hard Drive Partition in Mac OSX Lion

Most of the time you use desktop virtualization, you simply add a virtual hard drive and install a guest operating system (like (K)Ubuntu Linux) in it. But some times – as in my case – you already have another operation system on a partition on your native hard drive. For a mac it’s either via Bootcamp or via something like rEfit enabling you to install a BIOS boot manager like Grub. Since it is kind of uncommon using such an existing partition for desktop virtualization, it is not supported (and documented) so good in the different virtualization solutions.
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Trouble with Black Screen in Parallels Desktop v9 with Linux Guest OS on Native Partition

This post is a follow up to Using Parallels Desktop v9 with Linux Guest OS in a Native Partition. After the successful utilization of an existing Linux installation in Parallels Desktop v9 you might want to install the Parallel Tools, in order to have a much nicer integration of the guest system.

But I had the problem, that right after installing the Parallel Tools for Linux AMD 64: The screen went black after the login, when the video driver had been loaded. So I uninstalled the parallel tools again and uninstalled all nvidia drivers which I had installed for dual boot use. Afterwards I reinstalled parallel tools and everything was fine.

Using Parallels Desktop v9 with Linux Guest OS in a Native Partition

Most of the time you use desktop virtualization, you simply add a virtual hard drive and install a guest operating system (like (K)Ubuntu Linux) in it. But some times – as in my case – you already have another operation system on a partition on your native hard drive. For a mac it’s either via Bootcamp or via something like rEfit enabling you to install a BIOS boot manager like Grub. Since it is kind of uncommon using such an existing partition for desktop virtualization, it is not supported (and documented) so good in the different virtualization solutions.
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Reversed Scrolling in Ubuntu

If you have installed ‘xmodmap’ you may add the following command in order to have reversed scrolling experience like in OS X Lion:

echo "pointer = 1 2 3 5 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12" >> ~/.Xmodmap

The next time you start ubuntu gnome desktop it will ask you, whether it should load the xmodmap (you should add the .Xmodmap file). There you go.

Menus with Icons in Ubuntu Karmic++

With the update to karmic koala ubuntu reversed the color scheme of context menus. Before the foreground had been dark and the background bright. Now, guess what, it’s the other way around. With this change, the property for showing icons in context menus has been disabled, too. This is due to transparency problems. Unfortunately, programs like eclipse make extensive use of this feature. So, not having these icons anymore is more than annoying.
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